Joseon Royal Culture Experience, Part 2

I arrived late to the class because there was an emergency meeting at my school that I had to find someone to ask someone else if I was required to be at the meeting, which of course I wasn’t since I’m not a licensed teacher in Korea. Even with my rushing I was half an hour late…that’s what I get for living on the other side of the Han (River).

This class focused on calligraphy and seals, which was a pity because I really don’t know too much about seals since seals are a common part of American culture. The only times that I needed to worry about a seal was when I was trying to get a visa or employment in another country and had to get something notorized or lately affixed with a apostille.

After a tour of the museum that focuses on calligraphy and seals and learning new Korean words, that I fear I’ll forget simply because I don’t talk about either calligraphy or seals in my everyday life, and that is somewhat a waste of knowledge :*( We went into another room to have a lesson on calligraphy itself.

The organization/museum invited a woman who has studied the calligraphy styles from the early Joseon dynasty for about twelve years. She taught us the proper way to hold a calligraphy brush, to move a calligraphy brush, to hold the parchment paper, to properly ink the brush and to make a simple line (it’s harder than it looks). After practicing making “simple” vertical and horizontal lines, we progressed to attempting to write words in the block lettering that was favored during King Joseon’s reign.

I tried I really did, but after more than a few dismal attempts, I gave into the American spirit that I tend to follow and made my own distinctive calligraphy typography. I don’t think that the instructor was too happy but I did try and well it wasn’t like I was doing something too bad. Once we finished writing whatever we decided to write, we were to use King Joseon’s seal to “authenticate” our period calligraphy. If you zoom in on the seal, what is the style that I was supposed to using, but I didn’t end up doing it.

Baik Eun Sook, my name, in an original calligraphy  because I couldn't do the block calligraphy that the kings of Joseon dynasty favored. yeay! Go American spirit!

Baik Eun Sook, my name, in an original calligraphy because I couldn't do the block calligraphy that the kings of Joseon dynasty favored. yeay! Go American spirit!

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